Win 7 32 bit VS. 64 bit
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Thread: Win 7 32 bit VS. 64 bit

  1. #1
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    Win 7 32 bit VS. 64 bit

    I need a new computer. I asked what the difference is in Win 7 32 bit and
    Win 7 64 bit. The answer was none except Win 32 bit is limited to 4 gb ram
    and Win 64 bit can have a lot of ram. Some of my programs will run on Win 7
    32 bit but not on 63 bit. If that is the only difference I will buy the 32 bit.
    Are they correct?

    jerry

  2. #2
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    Have you checked for a 64 bit version of each program?

    I am running quite a few old 32 bit programs on Win 7 with out problem.

  3. #3
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    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/w...sked-questions

    Note that when you buy the retail version, it comes with both 32 and 64 bit discs.

  4. #4
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    If you get Win 7 Pro, you might also be able to use the XP Mode to run those programs.

  5. #5
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    Windows 7 Forums > Windows 7: 64 bit vs 32 bit?
    ...
    Pros and Cons of a 64 bit system:
    • You can address much more than 4GB of memory, which is ideal for avid gamers, CAD, video editors and heavy multi-taskers. However, any 32 bit software you use will still be restricted to 4GB memory – you need a 64 bit CPU, OS and applications to take full advantage of the extra RAM.

    • 16 bit applications will no longer run. Although this is unlikely to be a problem, if you use very old software (from the Windows 3.1 days!) then it will not work under a 64 bit OS.

    • Existing 32 bit drivers no longer work.If you have older or poorly supported hardware you may find that it can no longer be used. Got a 7 year old scanner that just about works in Vista? You may not be able to get it working in 64 bit Windows 7.

    • Unsigned kernel-mode drivers no longer work. Along with the issue above, the inability to run unsigned kernel mode drivers will cause problems for old hardware. (There is reportedly a way to bypass this check).

    • Running some 32 bit applications on a 64 bit OS could actually be slower. The additional overheads in running 32 bit software in 64 bit mode could cause a slight degradation in performance. It will take some time for 64 bit software to become the norm.
    The conclusion? Well, it depends on what you use your system for. If you have a 64 bit capable CPU but use older hardware, it would be safe to stay with a 32 bit version for the time being to ensure that you don’t need extra upgrades.

    If you’ve got the latest hardware and drivers are available, then it would be worth while taking the step up to a 64 bit OS. If you regularly work with resource hungry applications that are 64 bit optimised (such as video editing, CAD and image packages) then it would be especially beneficial to be able to work with over 4GB of RAM amongst the other improvements.

    In the not too distant future, 64 bit computing will be a common standard – as all hardware from the last couple of years has been designed with this in mind. Until a complete upgrade cycle has passed for the majority of users, there is still a strong case for some users to stick with 32 bit Windows for the time being. Once more 64 bit applications start to appear, it would be a good time to make the switch to the new architecture.

  6. #6
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    I am using Windows7 64-bit, on 64-bit processor - I have used 32 bit windows XP before and now on 64-bit machine with 64-bit windows I cant feel any difference. Theres not much difference i guess if you get an entry level pc but maybe if you get the top end ones you'll feel the difference.

    I dunno about other software if they do 64-bit flavours e.g. google chrome and avast, etc, thats all i have installed for now. The only things that has improved greatly is my internet experience, things are much more faster there.
    Last edited by shahan; February 24th, 2012 at 08:36 AM.

  7. #7
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    Unless there are compelling reasons for staying with 32-bit (such as an old program that you just have to have which won't run in a virtual machine), then go for 64-bit. It is the future, and it won't be that much longer that there are no more 32-bit versions of Windows - the servers have already gone 64-bit only. There is no real downside to 64-bit, and what is often not mentioned, is that it is more secure than 32-bit as well, for various reasons.

    I've been exclusively 64-bit since then end of 2006, when Vista was released, and I had no problems getting drivers then. There are no driver issues at all now, unless you run very ancient peripherals.
    Nick.

  8. #8
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    Make sure you check driver compatibility in addition to programs. When I moved from 32-bit XP to 64-bit Windows 7, I lost a perfectly good scanner (it wasn't even that old) simply because the company did not make a 64-bit Windows 7 version of the driver.

    I still agree with everyone here that if you're buying a new computer, 64-bit is the way to go. But check the drivers just to make sure there won't be a rude surprise.
    My equipment:

    Acer Aspire AX3300-U1322 Desktop (sorry didn't build this time!), 4Gb RAM, AMD Athlon II quad core CPU

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NickC View Post
    Make sure you check driver compatibility in addition to programs. When I moved from 32-bit XP to 64-bit Windows 7, I lost a perfectly good scanner (it wasn't even that old) simply because the company did not make a 64-bit Windows 7 version of the driver.
    yeah, same thing exactly happened to me. I dunno why manufacturers cant make 64-bit drivers for a 2 year old perfectly good scanner if it can make 64-bits for new hardware. Its just these manufacturers money making tricks to get you to buy their next product.

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  11. #11
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    I believe the best word of advice I ever got about buying a 64bit computer (maybe it was here) was this. It helped me to make my mind up about going with the 64 rather than 32.

    I have found that about 99% of most all the applications I had in 32bit all seem to work in 64bit - so in the end that turned out not to really be much of an issue.

    The real issue is this...
    Each one of these Windows OS, peripherals (external drives, burners, etc) and especially the applications all seem to use more and more RAM. And it only seems like with each update there's a demand for more precious RAM.

    If you have a limited ceiling of only 4Gb then you can be sure that soon you're going to have a bit of future dilemma... but if your RAM is unlimited - that's one less future major headache that you won't even have to think about.

    IMHO - I'd go with the 64bit. Tomorrow will come.
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