Can I designate a different drive to be C:\
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Thread: Can I designate a different drive to be C:\

  1. #1
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    Can I designate a different drive to be C:\

    If so, how?

  2. #2
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    More details on what you are trying to accomplish would be helpful.

    Do you want to replace your current C: drive with a different drive and make that new replacement drive the C: drive?

    Do you want to make the boot drive something other than the C: drive?

    Are you wanting to move programs and/or data from the C: drive to a different drive?

    Do you want to boot from a different drive (e.g. D and still have a C: drive?

    Are you wanting to be able to boot from 2 different drives (with the same or different OSes)?
    Last edited by photolady; March 20th, 2020 at 02:25 AM. Reason: fixed typo

  3. #3
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    >Do you want to boot from a different drive (e.g. D and still have a C: drive?
    This would be the closest.

  4. #4
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    So, what would be on the C: drive if you are booting from D:? Another bootable OS drive? What is the actual objective that you are trying to achieve? Ordinarily, it shouldn't make any difference what drive has what letter, as long as the software installed on the drive can find all of its associated files, .dlls, and other components.

  5. #5
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    Some links to read (probably not useful, but possibly interesting):

    https://www.tenforums.com/general-su...0-d-drive.html

    https://www.cnet.com/forums/discussi...of-my-c-drive/

    https://smallbusiness.chron.com/boot...ive-53295.html

    https://superuser.com/questions/1510...t-from-d-drive

    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...c-c1f84fd0ce16


    Again, without knowing what you are trying to achieve, any instructions we might give you are likely to results in being able to boot from a drive labelled D: but with a complaint that "but now my system won't . . . ."

  6. #6
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    Windows 7 can be installed on my Asus Z390-E but it's problematic and I'm tired of playing with methods and iso's that don't work (for me)- that's what got me thinking of a possible workaround.

    From win 10, install win 7 to another drive and then make that drive the C:\ drive. Then get rid of 10 forever.

    Also, I only have 1 SSD and I think I would rather have that performance used for retreiving aidio samples that for boot speed.

    If the above is feasible, I guess I could just switch the physical location of the drives in the box?
    Last edited by Reverend; March 19th, 2020 at 06:35 PM.

  7. #7
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    Now you have me confused. How would you install Windows 7 from a running instance of Windows 10 to another drive? You are still going to need some install media to do that. If you have install media, you should be able to just boot from that and install. You will still need Windows 7 drivers if ou want your hardware to work when you try to boot Windows 7.

    You can try doing the Windows 7 install from a running Windows 10 installation to another drive, however, there is no guarantee that it will work. If you want to change the Windows 7 drive letter back to C: afterwards, but you may have issues that could be troublesome to fix.


    https://www.pcworld.com/article/3050...s-a-catch.html

    https://www.pcworld.com/article/2984...-doing-so.html

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...ter-in-windows

    https://forums.tomshardware.com/thre...-to-c.1537193/

    https://superuser.com/questions/2161...-windows-drive

    https://askleo.com/can-i-reassign-my-drive-letters/

    I wouldn't dump the Windows 10 installation either. You may find that you need it again at some future date, and there is no reason to go through the install and setup process again.

  8. #8
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    >If you have install media, you should be able to just boot from that and install.
    That results in 'required driver is missing - installation cannot continue. So I've been tryig to bundle the required driver into the installation .iso - it works for most people but Ive had no success.

    >You will still need Windows 7 drivers if ou want your hardware to work when you try to boot Windows 7.
    Exactly this is the priblem and you need drivers for the install.

    The issue is not supposed to happen if installing from an optical drive, so I dug one out and installed it but my BIOS doen't know it's there so I can't boot to it.

  9. #9
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    So your BIOS does not see your CD/DVD drive? Post the make and model of the drive, and how you are connecting it (PATA, SATA, USB, etc.). It might be far easier to get a CD/DVD drive that your BIOS does see to install from. That could save you a lot of time and effort later.

  10. #10
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    The drive has Super Writemaster written on it and nothing else. It's plugged into the bank of sata connections on the right side of the board (asus z-390-E) along with all the other disks.

  11. #11
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    Check the BIOS to make sure that all of the SATA ports are enabled.

    Try a different SATA port if you have not already done so.

    Double check the power lead and/or try a different one.

    Make sure that all motherboard drivers are installed.

    That drive should be a Samsung drive, so it should be decent quality. It could still be bad though. If all else fails, try a different drive. Use a known good one if you have one, even if you have to borrow one from another working computer.

  12. #12
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    >If all else fails, try a different drive.
    The drive works just fine, when the machine was running I could see the files on any disk I put in. I'll try the other suggestions and I think I also have a drive by LG that works.

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