[RESOLVED] Switch vs Hub (or 2nd Router)
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Thread: [RESOLVED] Switch vs Hub (or 2nd Router)

  1. #1
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    Resolved [RESOLVED] Switch vs Hub (or 2nd Router)

    This question came in my sleep since I have been playing around with IP Cameras.

    Should I get a switch or a hub in the case of adding on more security cameras? I know they have ethernet ports (POE cameras) but can a switch or a hub accept wireless cameras?

    Can I use an old router (Linksys WRT54G Wireless-G Router) as a switch or a hub? I believe this is called "client-bridge mode" basing from this thread: http://discussions.virtualdr.com/sho...41#post1540041

    At my mom's house, they use the above method. They have a router for the internet and then they plug an additional router into the first router for the alarm system.

    What would be the PROs vs CONs in terms of security, performance, etc... in using a switch, hub or router?
    Originally wanted Millenium Falcon as nick but there is character limitation.
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  2. #2
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    A switch is better than a hub. Hubs split the bandwidth across all ports, so you'd get lower performance.
    You can think of a client-bridge router as a wireless switch.

    Can I use an old router (Linksys WRT54G Wireless-G Router) as a switch or a hub?
    Yes, you can use it as a switch. If you disable the wireless AP and DHCP, then it's basically a wired switch.
    http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html

    I don't think the WRT54G had client-bridge mode by default. You'd need to flash it with a third party firmware like DDWRT or Tomato. You need to look at the exact version. I think there were at least 8 different versions.

    Not sure what you mean about security. Switches don't control security. As for wireless, that's controlled by the primary router, not the client-bridges.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Midnight.

    So if I disable the wireless AP and DHCP for the Linksys WRT54G Wireless-G Router, can I make it as an extender as well? In other words, do I have to use an Ethernet cable to connect it to the main router? Can I make it connect to the main router through wireless? And then the wireless cameras go to the Linksys WRT54G Wireless-G Router? Or will everything need to be wired going into and out the Linksys WRT54G Wireless-G Router?
    Originally wanted Millenium Falcon as nick but there is character limitation.
    Falcon Speed = Millenium Falcon = Light Speed

  4. #4
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    So if I disable the wireless AP and DHCP for the Linksys WRT54G Wireless-G Router, can I make it as an extender as well? In other words, do I have to use an Ethernet cable to connect it to the main router?
    No, that would just make it a switch. The link I posted shows how to make another WAP for the network. If you wanted to use it as a second WAP, then yes, you would need to connect a cable back to the main router.

    Can I make it connect to the main router through wireless?
    That's the client-bridge mode. Again, I don't think the WRT54G had that as a stock feature.

    And then the wireless cameras go to the Linksys WRT54G Wireless-G Router?
    No, that would be a wireless REPEATER, not a client-bridge. Client-bridges connect WIRED clients to the WIRELESS network. Wireless repeaters also cut the bandwidth in half, half to transmit and half to receive. So it'd be more like 27Mbps, rather than 54.

    What is your main router? I don't see why you'd connect wireless cameras through an old 54g router.

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    I though that connecting the security camera system to the second router, it would be more secure since that is how they did it for my mom's house for her alarm system, not camera system.

    OK, let me see if I have gotten this straighten out so please bare with me on my elementary knowledge on these items that you have just mentioned. I want to learn this because it is interesting.
    • If I use a cable to connect the 2nd router back to the Main router, and use its wireless, that is a WAP?
    • If I connect the 2nd router back to the Main router through wireless while the cameras (POE Clients) are connected to the 2nd router through cables, that is a Client Bridge? And the WRT54G might not support?
    • If I connect the 2nd router back to the Main router through wireless while the cameras (wireless Clients, not POE) are connected to the 2nd router through wireless WIFI, that is a Repeater?

    If all of the above are true, what is the difference between a repeater and an extender?
    Originally wanted Millenium Falcon as nick but there is character limitation.
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  6. #6
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    If I use a cable to connect the 2nd router back to the Main router, and use its wireless, that is a WAP?
    Yes, you would be adding a second WAP to your network.

    If I connect the 2nd router back to the Main router through wireless while the cameras (POE Clients) are connected to the 2nd router through cables, that is a Client Bridge? And the WRT54G might not support?
    Yes. In client-bridge mode, the second router connects wirelessly, and takes wired clients.
    It does NOT take wireless clients. The client-bridge router's wireless connection is only between itself and the main router.
    With the stock firmware, you'd only be able to add the WRT54G as a second WAP (see above).

    If I connect the 2nd router back to the Main router through wireless while the cameras (wireless Clients, not POE) are connected to the 2nd router through wireless WIFI, that is a Repeater?
    That's correct. The second router is acting as a network repeater back to the main router. Again, this cuts the bandwidth in half. You'd probably be better off connecting the wifi cameras directly to the main router instead.

    It depends what you mean by "extender". They all extend the range of your network, but in different ways.
    https://www.actiontec.com/wifihelp/w...wifi-repeater/

  7. #7
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    Thank you Midknyte for your patience and helping me understand your world.
    Originally wanted Millenium Falcon as nick but there is character limitation.
    Falcon Speed = Millenium Falcon = Light Speed

  8. #8
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    I am planning to install an IP camera system that uses POe. My router is upstair and I would like to leave the NVR downstair because most of the cameras will be installed downstair. Therefore, it would make more sense to leave the NVR downstair so that I don't have to run the Cat5e cable so much. However, the NVR needs to be connected to the router in order to have the ability to monitor through smart phone.

    Beside running/fishing the Cat5e cable to connect between the router and NVR, is there an alternative solution without impacting the performance? I read your provided knowledge (above) and you probably will recommend me to run that cable between the router and NVR.

    I have one additional question to the above that I did not cover the last time. If I connect the 2nd router back to the Main router with cable while the NVR is connected to the 2nd router through cables (disable wireless), would this be considered as a SWITCH? Is this what you recommend for this setup since I am also running out of ethernet ports.
    Originally wanted Millenium Falcon as nick but there is character limitation.
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  9. #9
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    Cable is ideal, because the wifi signal gets affected by walls, other devices, etc. You can try it and see, but I'd think running a cable would be best.

    If I connect the 2nd router back to the Main router with cable while the NVR is connected to the 2nd router through cables (disable wireless), would this be considered as a SWITCH?
    Yes, it would be a switch if you disabled the routing and wifi parts. If you're using the WRT54G, then it would be a fast ethernet (100Mbps) switch.

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