Ethernet Splitter
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Thread: Ethernet Splitter

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
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    East Horsley, Surrey, UK
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    Ethernet Splitter

    I am in the process of investigating buying a TV but this have moved on and I feel out of my depth!

    To date, all our TV watching has been on the computer monitor via the internet (playing DVD from the computer; catch-up TV; downloaded films and programs, etc.) so am not too concerned about having the TV for live broadcasts.

    The TV will be in a spare bedroom and i would like to connect a computer to it, then access all I want via the internet; basically, I guess it is being used as a large monitor.

    My router has the usual power and ADSL input and two outlets, one to each office computer. if I used a Powerline adaptor with two sockets on the top, presumably one is input and the other output, in which case, of the two router outlets, one (my computer) goes to the Powerline plug, and then my computer plugs into the other Powerline socket. In the bedroom, I understand how the adaptor works.

    The alternative is an ethernet splitter. Ethernet Splitter 2 (Medium).jpg

    Does one of these take router output from one of the two sockets and allow me to have my computer on-line and the other go to the Powerline adaptor?

    Thanks

    Rex
    Last edited by Rex A. Butcher; January 15th, 2017 at 09:44 AM.
    What if the Hokey Cokey IS what it's all about?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
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    Sheboygan, WI
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    If you do not have enough ports on your router, then add a switch.
    I have a computer and 2 printers and the cat5 to the switch plugged into the router.
    and my 8 port switch has the cat5 from the router and 4 desktops, that leaves me 3 open ports where I could connect things like a Powerline adaptor cat5 cable.

    Hope this helps.
    SMILE
    and post back. Let us know if it worked.
    [ Book mark this post to find it again]

    AntiX-16, MX-16 and Win 10

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Not real neat but hope it helps with my explanation. They do have 5 port switches that are cheaper.
    This method will type your computers and TV together at full speed.

    SMILE
    and post back. Let us know if it worked.
    [ Book mark this post to find it again]

    AntiX-16, MX-16 and Win 10

  4. #4
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    Ethernet splitters only allow you to use ONE device at a time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    East Horsley, Surrey, UK
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    Thanks for the replies. I feel like a complete gork asking what are obviously very basic questions. doing it is not the problem, understanding is!

    Getting a TV plugged into the internet via a laptop may be easier than I think and hopefully you can advise by looking at the attachment, which is the rear of my modem as it is at the moment with two computers attached. Modem (Medium).jpg

    Would one of the Ethernet ports 3 or Gig E (what is Gig E) connected to a Powerline adaptor do the trick?

    Thanks
    What if the Hokey Cokey IS what it's all about?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA
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    Would one of the Ethernet ports 3 or Gig E (what is Gig E) connected to a Powerline adaptor do the trick?
    The yellow ports are Gigabit Ethernet ports. Connecting one of those to a power line Ethernet adapter should do what you need, assuming that you are connecting the TV to another power line Ethernet adapter and that the power line Ethernet adapters can connect to each other.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
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    Sheboygan, WI
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    Found this.
    On the back of your BT Business Hub 3 you have four yellow Ethernet ports that allow you to connect devices to the Hub. Port 4 is labelled as GigE.

    GigE or Gigabit Ethernet is the way we talk about the technology for transmitting data at a rate of a gigabit per second (or 1,000 megabits per second). That's ten times faster than the other three ports, which transmit data at 100 megabits per second.

    If you've got BT Infinity then this allows devices that are connected to the GigE port to receive data at the same speed as it is received from the fibre connection.

    If you've got BT Business Broadband then you can use the GigE port to connect big, fast hard drives known as Network Attached Storage devices.
    Sorry about the long winded answer the first time, but I misread the question. But study the graphic and my explanation, DON"T ask how many times I studied it, before it sank in, and it will come to you.
    SMILE
    and post back. Let us know if it worked.
    [ Book mark this post to find it again]

    AntiX-16, MX-16 and Win 10

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