MBP Time machine
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Thread: MBP Time machine

  1. #1
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    MBP Time machine

    Hi! While I'm still fixing my desktop situation, I've resurrected my MacBook Pro for work. The MBP HDD 150gb total disk space with only 50gb used. I have a 100gb portable HDD which I would like to use as a time machine drive. Is the size sufficient? I've been researching online but it always refers to the laptop's total HDD size, instead of actual used data size.

    Also, in case my desktop would be discarded, I was thinking of using its internal 500gb sata drive (will buy an enclosure) as an external drive-- will this be a good idea to use it as a time machine drive instead?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Generally you would want to have a same size or larger back up drive.
    And what is on the time machine drive now will be lost when you format it to HFS.

    The MAC os can see and work with FAT 32 but NOT NTFS, so you would need to
    http://www.cnet.com/news/how-to-manu...write-in-os-x/
    Now to remember that link for daughter's MAC.

    You will want to read this
    http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/turn-na...achine-backup/

    Seems what you want to do is easy enough to start
    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202784

    Might want to look into SSD for the MAC.
    Examples:
    http://www.newegg.com/Internal-SSDs/SubCategory/ID-636
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  3. #3
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    Train, yes, formatting is no problem. The portable hard disk is on fat32 and prompted for Time Machine when plugged via usb. I was only unsure if its size (though twice the current data) is enough.

    Will look into the SSD. Does that mean the enclosured hdd fom the desktop is no good as a portable drive? Never tried one, so I don't know how they fare at all.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by advan View Post
    Train, yes, formatting is no problem. The portable hard disk is on fat32 and prompted for Time Machine when plugged via usb. I was only unsure if its size (though twice the current data) is enough.
    Twice at least. Really it depends on what you do. My backup USB drives are 3 TB in size. I have a lot of family genealogy graphics.

    Will look into the SSD. Does that mean the enclosured hdd fom the desktop is no good as a portable drive? Never tried one, so I don't know how they fare at all.[/QUOTE]

    SSD boot in 15 seconds instead of 2 minutes required for SATA or IDE hdds. Programs open MUCH, MUCH faster.
    That destop hdd will work just fine. I just hate for people to lose data is all I am saying. I hate losing it myself and is why I have 3 backups of what I would hate to lose and only one of the 3 on site at a time. Thinking fire, flooding, thief, etc can and does happen.
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  5. #5
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    I have a lot of family genealogy graphics.
    That I started in 2000, 16 years of work that I DO NOT want to up and disappear.
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  6. #6
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    Wow. That must be a LOT of data then! How do you backup thrice aside from the copy on the computer itself? One hard drive and 2 different cloud locations?

    SSD boot in 15 seconds instead of 2 minutes required for SATA or IDE hdds. Programs open MUCH, MUCH faster.
    2 mins?? Just to confirm-- a typical portable hard drive is pretty much accessible as soon as you plug it via usb. Do you mean an internal drive in an enclosure will take 2 mins to be accessible-- way longer than a ready-made external drive?

  7. #7
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    When you boot the computer using the internal hdd. Time how long it takes.

    I use syncback, and I just sync folder to folder.
    http://www.2brightsparks.com/syncback/syncback-hub.html

    I just sync the data in folders on my 2nd, 2 TB, hdd to the external drives. In this, I am not worried about anything on C:\ drive at all.
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  8. #8
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    I thought using the internal-turned-external hard drive as a spare drive would basically just be a removable usb data drive like a flash drive/store-bought portable drive that's just plug and play. I didn't realize it needs to do a 2min boot to be accessible!

    I liked using BitCompare on my Windows desktop to update my backup drive. Unfortunately, it doesn't work on OSX. Still need to research alternatives.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by advan View Post
    I thought using the internal-turned-external hard drive as a spare drive would basically just be a removable usb data drive like a flash drive/store-bought portable drive that's just plug and play.
    It would be just that.

    I didn't realize it needs to do a 2min boot to be accessible!
    I think you misunderstood. I was talking about a hdd with OS, installed in a computer, normal boot time.
    Why I suggested a SSD instead of a normal SATA/PATA harddrive for C drive.


    I liked using BitCompare on my Windows desktop to update my backup drive. Unfortunately, it doesn't work on OSX. Still need to research alternatives.
    There I am of no help.
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  10. #10
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    Ohhhh! ok, got it. I was reading up on enclosures, how it has a chip that you have to be careful of since you don't know what codes are written on it, etc.. I thought enclosured internal HDDs needed a "program" (not an OS) to be activated for use... Great then

    Train, although I'm not going to do this, I just want to ask to understand how it works-- a portable drive needs 2 things: power and data connector. In a typical PC tower, the HDD is connected to both PSU and the motherboard via SATA. If instead of a SATA cable, if a long SATA to USB cable is attached to it (taking the motherboard out of the equation) is this technically a ginormous "portable" drive that you can plug the usb end of the cable to a laptop? Meaning, you can even set up 5 HDDs in the tower case, connect them all to the PSU, and each has a SATA to USB cable-- so you can even choose which among the 5 HDDs you want to use... is it as simple as that?

  11. #11
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    Yes it is. Except you can NOT install Windows to a USB drive and boot it.
    Linux, you can install to a USB drive or stick and boot it. Fact is I use Bootable Linux sticks quite a bit.

    NOTE: Always use Safely Remove before unplugging USB drives or risk losing everything on it. Learned that the hard way.

    Now my desktop, about 4 years old now, has 6 SATA connectors on the motherboard.
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  12. #12
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    Oh interesting... From what I've read, portable HDDs only need 12v power supply to run. Is there no issue that only one or two HDDs are connected to a 500w PSU when it's powered on and nothing else (motherboard removed from the tower)? Doesn't the motherboard play a role in regulating how much power is supplied to the HDDs?

  13. #13
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    The externals that have powersupplies, my favorite kind, you can plug in as many as you have USB ports. No problems.


    Now, the Externals that use laptop, 2.5 inch hdds, they get there power from the USB, so you can only plug in one at a time. and as I use a USB mouse and some laptops only have 2 USB ports, that limits me right there.
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  14. #14
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    3.5" AC-powered external hard drives are typically called "desktop external" HDs.
    2.5" USB-powered external hard drives are typically called "portable external" HDs.

    Both Newegg and Best Buy list them that way.
    http://www.newegg.com/Hard-Drives/Ca...ID-15?Tid=6670
    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/hard-dri...at186100050005

    You can use multiple portable HDs if you use a powered USB hub.

  15. #15
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    Train/Midknyte- What I meant was, in the hypothetical tower-turned-ginormous-external hdd scenario, where the motherboard is completely bypassed or removed, is it safe for just one or two internal HDDs to be powered by the existing 500w PSU? Won't that much power supply fry the HDDs since it won't be powering up a motherboard together with the HDDs anymore? I've read mobos regulate how much power HDDs get.

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